In the previous post, I stated the problem I had with the PVC bathroom door. The solution I mentioned was to remove the damaged part of the PVC door jamb and replace it with a block of wood.

In this post, I'll discuss the materials, tools and procedures required to replace the damaged part.

Materials and Tools
  1. Block of wood to fit into the damaged area. In this case, the block measures 3" x 1 1/4" x 1/2". Optionally, you can treat it with a termite-proofing solution. Prepare this beforehand.
  2. Construction adhesive or glue. I used Selley's Liquid Nails.
  3. Sealant or Glazing Putty
  4. Quick Dry Paint (White, oil-based)
  5. Paintbrush (3/4")
  6. Sandpaper (#80 - 100)
  7. Pencil
  8. Ruler
  9. Sharp Cutter or Razor Blade
  10. Phillips type Screwdriver
  11. Flat Screwdriver or Spatula

Removing the Damaged PVC Material

Decide on the amount of PVC material to remove. In my case, because of the extent of the damage and the aforementioned reasons in the first post, the area in the PVC door jamb measures 3" x 1 1/4".

With a pencil and ruler, mark out this area on the PVC door jamb.

With a sharp cutter or razor blade, cut out this area as shown below.


After cutting the marked outline on the PVC, use the cutter or flat screwdriver to pry out the cut piece. This PVC material is actually brittle and is easy to break off. Turned on its side, you can see how thin the PVC material really is.


Attaching the Wood Block

Removing the PVC strip will leave a rectangular hole in the PVC door jamb where you will position and glue the wood block.

After preparing the appropriate sized wood block, apply a strong construction adhesive or glue on 3 sides of the wood block. This will be on the back side and the left and right sides. Essentially, all sides of the wood block that will make contact with any material inside the jamb will need to be glued.


Smear the adhesive liberally on all 3 sides for a sure bond. Any excess can be removed later.

Carefully position the wood block inside the rectangular hole, making sure that all the sides of the wood bond with the rest of the material inside the PVC door jamb.

With your finger, push in adhesive into any obvious gaps in the sides of the wood block. Remove all other excess adhesive with a rag,

When the construction adhesive had dried, use glazing putty or some sealant to finish the exposed face of the wood block. I simply used my finger to spread white colored sealant and fill in any more gaps. Spread lightly on the entire exposed face of the wood block.


Wait until the construction adhesive AND the glazing putty (or sealant) have reasonably cured and dried. Depending on the material you used, this may be up to a couple of days. Read the labels to be sure.

Finishing the Exposed Face of the Wood Block

After the bond has hardened, use a flat screwdriver or spatula to scrape excess adhesive or putty material that has settled on the PVC material outside of the wood block. The PVC material's surface is very smooth and this excess adhesive can be easily scraped off.


Rub sandpaper lightly on the exposed face of the wood block to smooth out any rough areas. Remember, the finishing of the wood doesn't have to be very smooth. After all, this area will be painted and covered with the metal hinge later on.


When the wood face is reasonably smooth, use a paintbrush and paint the wood face white.

The next post on this series will discuss steps you can do refurbish the PVC door itself.


 

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